Children’s dental emergencies at the emergency dentist in Southgate

Accidents happen, but it is hard not to panic and seemingly impossible to keep a level head when your child is the injured party. However, as a parent, it is essential to stay calm, help to alleviate some of their pain, and seek out medical attention immediately.

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Without closely examining the affected site, it is challenging to determine the source and severity of the cut, wound, or fracture, so call our emergency dentist in Southgate and request an urgent appointment. Otherwise, phone our Adams Dental hotline for advice if it is after-hours, or failing that, get promptly to an emergency room.

What constitutes a dental emergency?

Unlike medical emergencies, a dental emergency is not often a life-or-death scenario. That said, the issue should not be dismissed, because if it is left untreated, you could be putting your offspring’s oral health at risk.

From knocked-out and fractured teeth to persistent, out-of-the-blue toothache, our emergency dentist in Southgate sees trauma in different forms every day.

  • A knocked-out tooth

Time is of the essence when your child knocks out one of their teeth. The pearly white needs to be repositioned in place within thirty minutes to one hour following the incident if it is an adult tooth. The longer that it is left out, the smaller your chances will be to save it. If it is a ‘baby’ tooth this may be better left out, always call for our dental advice straight away.

What you can do

Keep the tooth hydrated in a milk solution. People make the mistake of placing knocked-out teeth in water, which only dries out the roots. Although you can rinse out your child’s mouth with warm water to relieve pain and to wash away any blood. With adult teeth, the tooth can be tucked in the cheek or repositioned in the socket to keep it moist, but this poses a swallowing hazard to younger children. Much will depend on whether it is a baby tooth or ‘second’ tooth as to the course of action our dentist will take.

  • A fractured tooth

Depending on how broken the tooth is, your child will need to see our emergency dentist so that we can determine the extent of the damage.

In the meantime

  • Try to collect the fragments of the tooth that fell out
  • Rinse your injured child’s mouth with warm water and press something cold on the affected site to prevent swelling.
  • If your offspring complains about pain, it is fine to use a recommended children’s painkiller, (not aspirin though, as it is a blood thinner), just follow the instructions on the back of the box. You can always check with us first.
  • Severe toothache

There can be many reasons for toothache, and not all of them are classified as dental emergencies. However, for your child, it can be a frightening experience that seems to go on endlessly.

The most common reason for constant discomfort is often tooth decay, caused by a sugar-laden diet, so a long-term solution for this issue is a diet change and to revisit your child’s dental hygiene practices. The short-term solution is to treat the source of the pain, which requires a trip to the emergency dentist in Southgate.

Try helping to relieve the pain by

  • Pressing a cold pack against their cheek
  • Rinsing the mouth out with warm salt water
  • Using mild over-the-counter pain relievers

How do I prepare for future dental problems?

Dental emergencies are unpredictable. However, you can prepare for the worst with a first aid dental kit in your home.

Include the following in your kit:

  • Gauze
  • Mouthwash
  • Cold compress
  • A tooth-storage device and fluid.